The Children of the Sun Gene

The Children of the Sun Gene

 the children of the sun geneMany archaic peoples regarded the Sun as female and the first divinity. The Choctaw Indians, who exhibit a frequency of 36% of this gene, returned the spirits of the dead to the Mother Creator by exposing their bones to sunlight after bone-picker priests de-fleshed them. Among the Natchez Indians the paramount chief was called the Great Sun. He was always the son of the Female Sun, whose daughter would be the mother of the next Great Sun. The Children of the Sun Gene is rare in most populations and cannot be said to be common even in the peoples that show it. It seems to be divided between American Indians (North American Natives 16%, Andean Indians 15%) and Mediterranean peoples (Greek 16%), with side concentrations in Mongolians (22%), who famously still live on “sun time,” and for reasons not readily apparent, in aboriginal Taiwanese (14%). On the opposite end of the distribution curve worldwide are Central Africans, who have less than 1%. In the Americas, the highest incidences are among the Sioux (who celebrate a famous sun dance even today—40%), Creek Indians (25%) and Apache and Mojave Indians (22%). Was there a reason the earliest Greeks called themselves Children of the Sun (Ionians), just as did the Egyptians, Armenians and Uchee Indians?

The Children of the Sun Gene map

Rare Genes from History