Premium Female Report Only

Premium Female Report Only

Sample-Premium-Female-DNA-Ancestry-Report-Only.pdf DOWNLOAD PDF

Compiles the history of the mitochondrial DNA passed to you by your mother, using the results you already have from testing at another laboratory. We use scores from one or both of the control regions known as HVRI and HVRII.

The “mutations” defining your maternal lineage (the DNA of your mother, her mother and so forth, all the way back) are researched in a standard article n mitochondrial ancestry, the Cambridge Mitochondrial DNA Concordance and other databases. A history of your particular female lineage is assembled, with comparative frequencies in world populations.

Your report is delivered to you by email within about another week. It includes:

  • Comparison of your mitochondrial DNA with others’ from studies published in databases
  • Confirmation on whether your mitochondrial lineage is Eurasian, Native American, Asian or African
  • History and description of your particular female lineage (haplotype)
  • References
  • FAQs and complete access to our Learning Center
  • Hyperlinked terms for easy lookup online
  • Unlimited help online and by email or phone so that you can understand and use your ancestry report
  • Free bonus download of pioneering paper on epigenetics and the history of personal genome testing . . . “Epigenetics and the Autosomal DNA of Human Populations, by Anne Marie Fine and Donald N. Yates (2014)

Epigenetics and the Autosomal DNA of Human Populations

Select hard copy if you wish to receive a mailed paper report in addition to email.

Includes free instant download: Epigenetics and the Autosomal DNA of Human Populations: Clinical Perspectives and Personal Genome Tests

“Epigenetics and the Autosomal DNA of Human Populations: Clinical Perspectives and Personal Genome Tests”

Article by Anne Marie Fine and Donald N. Yates

The International Journal of Community Diversity, vol. 13 (July 2014), pp. 22-42.

ABSTRACT:  Although the fields of direct-to-the-consumer DNA testing and genetic counseling have experienced rapid growth in the past five years—providing people with increasingly accurate analyses of their ancestry, admixture, family medical history, and risk factors for disease—the subtle role of epigenetics in heredity has not been comparably exploited in medical research or greatly appreciated by the wider public. The history of DNA testing in the consumer realm reveals a shift from sex-linked testing and easily-traced Y-chromosome and mitochondrial lines of descent to an emphasis on autosomal results, which are more diversified, complex, and determinative. Matches showing ancestral relatedness are now possible to autosomal populations based on forensic science, ethnic strains, and multi-generational markers—such as Native American and Jewish. Epigenetics, defined as the superstructure of genes, are sometimes linked to population genetics to explore the environmental effect upon genes, nutrition, and a host of transgenerational factors in susceptibility to diabetes, cancer, stress, and other diseases or conditions. Specific areas discussed here are the Dutch Hunger Winter Study, methylation, cancer, stress, and environmental toxins (including fungicides and air pollution and neurological diseases). The emerging field of epigenetics—with its emphasis on environment and nutrition—is thus superseding the older model of genetic determinism in dictating people’s health decisions, self-identity, and ways of understanding their individual ancestry and ethnicity.